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Bitter fruits of Russian decolonization

The Georgian crisis is interpreted differently. Human rights, superpowers, economically and strategically. The giant stepped on the dwarf. The bear raises its head. Restrictions on the control of oil and gas routes from and around Russia will not be allowed by Moscow. Different interpretations with a common denominator. The Eurasian empire is reviving, and the short democratizing intermezzo is giving way to deep-seated tendencies to dominance and despotism.

Georgia - Part 1

South Ossetia lies on the southern foothills of the Caucasus. There are 50 different ethnic groups living side by side, many of whom belong to completely different language groups. These differences exacerbate the intolerance that has existed in the region for centuries. The war in South Ossetia in the summer of 2008 was the result of long-standing political disputes and sporadic military clashes that killed dozens of people.

Russia - Georgian relations and the war on Abkhazia and South Ossetia

After the collapse of the Soviet Union, Moscow tried to find a way to maintain influence in the post-Soviet republics. To this end, the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) was founded in 1991, which was joined by most of the post-Soviet states. Georgia refused to join the CIS. Since then, Russia's entire relationship with Georgia has been based on efforts to force Georgia to join the CIS. The growing ethnic conflicts between the Georgians and local minorities, which eventually escalated into a war between Georgia and separatist Abkhazia and South Ossetia, respectively, seemed to be a great means of coercion.

Russia - Georgian relations and the war on Abkhazia and South Ossetia: 1. Georgia's relations with Russia

Georgia's relations with Russia are one of the fundamental keys to understanding the conflicts in Abkhazia and South Ossetia. Without taking into account the broadest context of these relations, it is not possible to properly orientate oneself in the complex issues of the origin and course of conflicts and the large number of reversals in their resolution.

Russia - Georgian relations and the war on Abkhazia and South Ossetia: 2. Georgia and national minorities

At the time of its independence, 70% of Georgians and 30% of representatives of ethnic minorities ( mainly Armenians, Russians, Azerbaijanis, Ossetians, Greeks and Abkhazians ) lived in Georgia. At that time, Russians ( occupiers ) and other ethnic minorities, especially the Ossetians and Abkhazians, who were called " guests on Georgian soil ", were not particularly welcome in the country.

Russia - Georgian relations and the war on Abkhazia and South Ossetia: Conclusion

Russia willingly provided weapons to Georgia to exacerbate the situation in the conflict zones and secure a mediator position so that it could control the conflicts so that Georgia could reach a " dead end " and be forced to join the Commonwealth of Independent States and use Russian " disciplinary " assistance. rebellious territories.
The motive was also to prevent the independence of the separatist Georgian territories, so as not to set a precedent to which Chechnya, one of the entities of the Russian Federation that shared separatist sentiments with Abkhazia and South Ossetia, could set itself.

Russia - Georgian relations and the war on Abkhazia and South Ossetia: Introduction

After the collapse of the Soviet Union, Moscow tried to find a way to maintain influence in the post-Soviet republics. To this end, the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) was founded in 1991, which was joined by most of the post-Soviet states. Georgia refused to join the CIS. Since then, Russia's entire relationship with Georgia has been based on efforts to force Georgia to join the CIS. The growing ethnic conflicts between the Georgians and local minorities, which eventually escalated into a war between Georgia and separatist Abkhazia and South Ossetia, respectively, seemed to be a great means of coercion.

Why does Moldova not occupy Transnistria?

A special relic of the Cold War, which today de facto acts as an independent state unit with the official name of the Transnistrian Republic of Moldova, arose in the dynamic period of the collapse of the USSR. One of the secondary effects of Gorbachev's perestroika was the rise of nationalism and ethnic separatism in various parts of the Soviet empire. An exception was not Moldova, whose high Soviet adopted Moldovan as the only official language in August 1989 and declared the return of Moldovan to the Latin alphabet.

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